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Business to Business Online Expos

The Not-So ‘Foo Foo’ Advice for a Successful Expo

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mic_speakOver time, I’ve given you some great tips on this blog and on our iTunes podcast, about how to have a successful show as an Exhibitor. Based on my own experience and the expertise of many others I interviewed, I have given you some sure fire points that will help your company succeed on the convention floor.

Don’t ignore my previous advice.  Absorb it and apply it.

However, while those kind of fun and fluffy ideas will all lead to positive results for your business, I want to tighten the bolts a little and point you towards some heavier approaches.  I want to introduce you to a way to turn it up a little and add some practices that most companies don’t have the knock-a-cheekies to attempt.

         [Definition: Knock-a-cheekies (noun)- a made up word that I can say in front of my                    kids because only I know that it refers to a part of the male anatomy synonymous with                courage and boldness]

InsideSales.com self-proclaimed ‘inside sales evangelist’. Ken Kroque, writes a blog for Forbes.com. In one of his recent posts, Kroque wrote, “Never go to a show that you can’t speak at. Enough said. And sitting on a panel with 4 other people isn’t the same as speaking, but it’s better than nothing. If you can’t speak, make your own event that you can speak at and invite everyone in your database to come hear you speak at the show. Oh, and speak well.”

That is awesome advice.  Most expos are teased and advertised almost a year in advance.  Organizers don’t have a solid ‘line-up’ of speakers, seminars and education training–sometimes up to one month before the doors open.  And even if shows have scheduled a good range of speakers and events, they are very aware that as showtime gets closer, cancellations are a reality.  They will want to overbook or have a back up list.

So…find the niche’ that you can teach and present it.  But as Kroque advises in his piece, your presentation can’t be all about you and your company.

Ken continued, “When you speak, don’t pitch your stuff. Grow your industry. If your content and research is really good, people will flock to you. If you sell your stuff on stage, they flock away from you. If you help them provide answers to difficult questions, they turn to you to help them in their business. But people hate sitting through a sales pitch masquerading as a seminar… don’t do it. It hurts you. Have faith in your content and value.”

Be a resource first.  They will remember you for it.  Give them a way to reach out to you following your event and then sell them outside of your training session.  Read the rest of Ken Kroque’s piece here.

Good stuff!

Have a great show!

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