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Business to Business Online Expos


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It’s Hard to go Swimming in a Blizzard

AtlanticCityThe Pool and Spa Show [2015] just wrapped up at the Atlantic City Convention Center yesterday and it’s pretty safe to gather that Attendees were hesitant to come out for a dip with dipping temperatures and a blizzard threatened to slam South Jersey.

MARTIN DeANGELIS of Press of Atlantic City wrote, “The weather apparently held attendance down a bit Tuesday — even if the snow was nowhere near as much as most forecasters feared, at least in New Jersey. But the organizers and vendors said they expected the crowds to pick up before the show ends Thursday.”

But it didn’t.

Not by much anyway.

And Exhibitors that spent thousands, even tens of thousands of dollars were very disappointed with the results.

No one is blaming the expo itself, their sponsors or convention center. It wasn’t their fault.

It’s that little unforeseen thing that happens sometimes called, “Act of God”. There’s nothing anyone can do about it and for those who frequent the trade shows every year, it’s not the first time this has happened–and definitely won’t be the last.

Every year, businesses spend collectively over $8 billion dollars to exhibit at trade shows. Companies do this because expos are a necessary part of doing business. However, aside from high costs, office interruptions, weather disruptions and employee wrangling, there is another issue 9 out of 10 business owners will tell you they have with these shows.

Lack of time.

A 2-3 day long expo doesn’t give companies enough time to see even half of the current and potential customers they are planning to connect with.

Trade shows are an important part of doing business. I’m not implying that your company shouldn’t attend them. With most businesses, showing at an expo is crucial for growth.

What I am saying is, if there was a way for you and your company to exhibit at an industry specific, on-going business to business trade show, with an unlimited amount of attendees from all over the world, at a cost about 98% less expensive then what you would spend at your typical show, would this be of interest to your company?

If you answered, “YES”, click HERE.


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Engaging Attendees at Your Booth

I love the Swag Vending Machine! Awesome idea!

 What other things can you do to make your convention experience better for others?

Some great ideas here.


 

To reach professionals worldwide in your specific industry check out InternetTradeShows.com!


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What if the trade show industry was run like the airlines?

airporttrtadeWritten by: Jim Obermeyer

What if the trade show industry were run like airlines?

Several months ago I saw an article in the Wall Street Journal entitled “If the World Were Run Like Airlines”.  In this ‘altered’ world, sandwich prices would spike at peak hours and ‘priority’ elevators at the hotel would cost extra.  Grocery stores would narrow their aisles to get more product in the store and generate more revenue.

While this article poked fun at the vagaries of the over-regulated and super competitive airline business, it got me thinking about our industry.  How much different than the airline industry is the trade show industry, really?

Imagine if airlines ran trade shows.  We’d work in an industry where price changes happen at a moment’s notice, where customers are hit with penalties of hundreds of dollars and schedules don’t necessarily mean much.  Just imagine…

In the airline industry, buy your ticket more than 14 days out and it’s one price; buy it the day of your flight and it can be more than double.  In the trade show industry, reserve your show services two months out and it’s one price; wait until you’re on show site and it can be more than double.

In the airline industry a multitude of outside influences – weather, traffic, and mechanical issues – can impact flight schedules and cause delays that an individual passenger has no control over.  In the trade show industry a multitude of outside influences – weather, traffic, jammed marshalling yards – can impact the delivery of freight to an exhibit, something the individual exhibitor has no control over.

Read the rest of the story here.


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Follow Internet Trade Shows on Social Media

We are becoming a well respected business and trade show news and commentary resource. Make sure you don’t miss a thing by staying connected with us on social media. Click on the links below to sign up:

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Expo Exit Poll

Acts of God aren’t the only events that could heartbreak [or wallet-break] a company that is looking forward to exhibiting in various trade shows. There are so many horror stories out there from companies that had great plans for a convention, until disaster hit by events out of their control.

What about you? What caused you or your company to ‘exit’ past conventions. Heck, maybe you didn’t even make it to the show. Let us know!

 


Imagine if there was a place that incorporated all the aspects of a traditional trade show but offered the experience online, 24/7/365? A place where people could still have a business to business experience, show new products, network with other industry specific peers and customers?

www.InternetTradeShows.com 


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NAPE ‘Rockies’ Opened This Morning

NAPE_Denver_mediaThe annual networking event that brings together the players necessary to forge, facilitate and close deals, opened this morning in Denver.

NAPE offers prospects, producers and purchasers a unique chance to connect, reconnect, and make deals. More intimate than the annual NAPE Summit, this show is a “must attend” event for those who want to network with the people and players that have firsthand knowledge of the opportunities and prospects throughout the area.

The event is broken out into sessions that bring together respected and renowned speakers, vendors and attendees.

View the 2014 NAPE Denver Schedule of Events or view the NAPE Denver website for more info.


ABOUT NAPE

NAPE is the oil and gas industry’s marketplace for the buying, selling and trading of prospects and for producing properties.

Founded in 1993 by AAPL, with partners IPAA, SEG and AAPG added over the next several years, NAPE has become the largest organization of its kind in the world, providing unmatched venues for oil and gas professionals to meet, network, connect and do business. With over 27,000 attendees expected this year, NAPE events truly are the place where deals happen.


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Sorry, Your Seminar Put Me To Sleep

presentationIs it a requirement for all seminars to be boring? Seriously, I don’t want to be cruel and trample on anyone’s efforts but I don’t think I’ve ever attended a seminar that kept me alert and involved–let alone entertained. In a not-so-scientific estimation, I’m going to predict that the majority of seminar attendees are with me on this.

Why do we have seminars?  According to the folks over at Brunel University in London, England, seminars create opportunities to:

  • explore topics in more depth
  • share ideas in a way that will advance your thinking
  • learn from other people’s experiences and background knowledge
  • gain points of view that you might not have otherwise considered

However, as beneficial as all of those points sound, author, R.B. Holbrook, says, “people only retain only 5% of what they are taught at a lecture.”

Five percent.  Your name, the name of your product and the name of your company is probably close to 1% of that.  So the true stat would come out to about 4%.  Four percent retained in your lecture.

“But I don’t do a lecture, I conduct a seminar,” you may have thought after reading that.

Okay, then if it’s a seminar…why does it feel like a lecture?

Let me answer it for you…

BECAUSE EVERYONE IS BORED OUT OF THEIR MINDS!

Just because you, as the host, attended seminars in the past where some old guy spent two hours crawling through a slide show, don’t think that this a model you should follow.  Trust me, if you hated it when you experienced it, the rest of us ain’t gonna like it either–no matter how great your company is. And the free bagels and coffee isn’t gonna make up for the colossal waste of time we all will experience.

I’m sincerely not trying to be rude but it is a waste of time.  If you’re going to spend all the money to prep for an event like this by booking a hall, catering the food, paying a staff and renting equipment, wouldn’t you want the audience to leave with an incredible understanding of the content?

Of course you do. So, how do you achieve that?

Switch it up. Get away from normal or mundane and put on an exciting, interactive education “show”. Yes, I said a show. Something that requires prep and rehearsal. Put on a presentation that may require multiple people to pull off. If you can’t handle it, hire a team that can. At the end of the day, your goal for your audience is to retain the information. Take it one step further, if the audience works for your company, you absolutely need for them to retain as much as possible so that they can move your product more efficiently with higher production.

Christina Hamlett of eHow.com said, “If you’re not even halfway into the seminar and your listeners are already yawning, looking at their watches or working crossword puzzles, it’s a good indicator that you’re not keeping them totally engaged.”

Christina then continues in her piece and gives great tips and suggestions on how to get your audience engaged.  It’s a great article and you can read it HERE.

Just take yourself back to grade school.  Do you remember that history teacher with the monotone voice who said, “In 1734, the southern colonies were integrated into a large division of……zzzzzzzzzzzzz”?  You don’t remember the rest right?  Why?

BECAUSE YOU FELL ASLEEP!

You hated that class and you struggled to pass it because you found it very difficult to learn from that teacher.

Then why do that to your clients, peers, expo attendees or colleagues?

Change things up and make it fun.  It doesn’t matter what the subject matter is, people stay awake and retain information when they are having fun.  And then they become advocates for whatever it is you’re teaching.

Enjoy yourself and they will enjoy themselves.


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The Not-So ‘Foo Foo’ Advice for a Successful Expo

mic_speakOver time, I’ve given you some great tips on this blog and on our iTunes podcast, about how to have a successful show as an Exhibitor. Based on my own experience and the expertise of many others I interviewed, I have given you some sure fire points that will help your company succeed on the convention floor.

Don’t ignore my previous advice.  Absorb it and apply it.

However, while those kind of fun and fluffy ideas will all lead to positive results for your business, I want to tighten the bolts a little and point you towards some heavier approaches.  I want to introduce you to a way to turn it up a little and add some practices that most companies don’t have the knock-a-cheekies to attempt.

         [Definition: Knock-a-cheekies (noun)- a made up word that I can say in front of my                    kids because only I know that it refers to a part of the male anatomy synonymous with                courage and boldness]

InsideSales.com self-proclaimed ‘inside sales evangelist’. Ken Kroque, writes a blog for Forbes.com. In one of his recent posts, Kroque wrote, “Never go to a show that you can’t speak at. Enough said. And sitting on a panel with 4 other people isn’t the same as speaking, but it’s better than nothing. If you can’t speak, make your own event that you can speak at and invite everyone in your database to come hear you speak at the show. Oh, and speak well.”

That is awesome advice.  Most expos are teased and advertised almost a year in advance.  Organizers don’t have a solid ‘line-up’ of speakers, seminars and education training–sometimes up to one month before the doors open.  And even if shows have scheduled a good range of speakers and events, they are very aware that as showtime gets closer, cancellations are a reality.  They will want to overbook or have a back up list.

So…find the niche’ that you can teach and present it.  But as Kroque advises in his piece, your presentation can’t be all about you and your company.

Ken continued, “When you speak, don’t pitch your stuff. Grow your industry. If your content and research is really good, people will flock to you. If you sell your stuff on stage, they flock away from you. If you help them provide answers to difficult questions, they turn to you to help them in their business. But people hate sitting through a sales pitch masquerading as a seminar… don’t do it. It hurts you. Have faith in your content and value.”

Be a resource first.  They will remember you for it.  Give them a way to reach out to you following your event and then sell them outside of your training session.  Read the rest of Ken Kroque’s piece here.

Good stuff!

Have a great show!