Business to Business Online Expos

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It’s Hard to go Swimming in a Blizzard

AtlanticCityThe Pool and Spa Show [2015] just wrapped up at the Atlantic City Convention Center yesterday and it’s pretty safe to gather that Attendees were hesitant to come out for a dip with dipping temperatures and a blizzard threatened to slam South Jersey.

MARTIN DeANGELIS of Press of Atlantic City wrote, “The weather apparently held attendance down a bit Tuesday — even if the snow was nowhere near as much as most forecasters feared, at least in New Jersey. But the organizers and vendors said they expected the crowds to pick up before the show ends Thursday.”

But it didn’t.

Not by much anyway.

And Exhibitors that spent thousands, even tens of thousands of dollars were very disappointed with the results.

No one is blaming the expo itself, their sponsors or convention center. It wasn’t their fault.

It’s that little unforeseen thing that happens sometimes called, “Act of God”. There’s nothing anyone can do about it and for those who frequent the trade shows every year, it’s not the first time this has happened–and definitely won’t be the last.

Every year, businesses spend collectively over $8 billion dollars to exhibit at trade shows. Companies do this because expos are a necessary part of doing business. However, aside from high costs, office interruptions, weather disruptions and employee wrangling, there is another issue 9 out of 10 business owners will tell you they have with these shows.

Lack of time.

A 2-3 day long expo doesn’t give companies enough time to see even half of the current and potential customers they are planning to connect with.

Trade shows are an important part of doing business. I’m not implying that your company shouldn’t attend them. With most businesses, showing at an expo is crucial for growth.

What I am saying is, if there was a way for you and your company to exhibit at an industry specific, on-going business to business trade show, with an unlimited amount of attendees from all over the world, at a cost about 98% less expensive then what you would spend at your typical show, would this be of interest to your company?

If you answered, “YES”, click HERE.


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Bad to the Bone Booth Staff

Bad Booth Staff

Bad Booth Staffers

I found a great little piece on the web about bad booth staffers.  If you are an exhibitor, you’ll be able to relate to this. Take notes. Some of these can help you at your next expo. writes:

He did what? She said what? And in our booth.

You may be surprised at the Booth Staffers Behaving Badly that goes on at trade shows.  Or, maybe not, since you’ve had to endure it yourself; staffers so bad they were actually dragging down your corporate image, losing more business than they brought in.

Unfortunately, there always have been, and always will be bad booth staffers. Here’s a list of some of the perpetrators:

1. The Networker:  The Networker spends most of his booth staff shift talking, but instead of having concise conversations with clients and prospects, he whiles away the expensive show hours talking with other sales people, corporate management, and anyone else who will listen — as long as he doesn’t have to actually take a lead.

2. The Fire Hose:  Instead of asking attendees good questions, listening for specific pains, needs, and goals, and responding with an appropriate presentation, the Fire Hose lets loose the same unending stream of corporate speak, drowning the attendee with irrelevant messages.  They offend your booth visitors and wash away your return on investment at the same time.

3. The Wall Flower:  While being an introvert is no barrier to great booth staffing, a Wall Flower lacks the courage and initiative to start a conversation with passing attendees.  Booth staffers that wait on the sidelines for attendees to walk in the booth will get a small fraction of the leads of a staffer willing to engage visitors in the aisle.

4. The Debbie Downer:  While constructive criticism is essential for growth, Debbie Downers are permanently parked in a dark place. These perpetually pessimistic people are a danger to your company’s brand, as they drag down their fellow booth staffers by their continuous complaining about each and everything possible. They don’t exactly light up the world with prospects, either!

5. The Invisible Man:  While not activity destroying your brand equity through poor performance, The Invisible Man (or Woman) doesn’t show up for their booth shift, leaving your remaining staff to pick up the load, and lowering your lead count potential.  Even worse is if your Invisible Man has essential, unique expertise, such as demonstrating a new product.

Read the rest of them HERE.